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OpenAPI Directory | Cenit Admin

AWS IoT

AWS IoT provides secure, bi-directional communication between Internet-connected devices (such as sensors, actuators, embedded devices, or smart appliances) and the AWS cloud. You can discover your custom IoT-Data endpoint to communicate with, configure rules for data processing and integration with other services, organize resources associated with each device (Registry), configure logging, and create and manage policies and credentials to authenticate devices.

For more information about how AWS IoT works, see the Developer Guide.

For information about how to use the credentials provider for AWS IoT, see Authorizing Direct Calls to AWS Services.

AWS IoT

AWS IoT-Data enables secure, bi-directional communication between Internet-connected things (such as sensors, actuators, embedded devices, or smart appliances) and the AWS cloud. It implements a broker for applications and things to publish messages over HTTP (Publish) and retrieve, update, and delete thing shadows. A thing shadow is a persistent representation of your things and their state in the AWS cloud.

AWS IoT Jobs is a service that allows you to define a set of jobs — remote operations that are sent to and executed on one or more devices connected to AWS IoT. For example, you can define a job that instructs a set of devices to download and install application or firmware updates, reboot, rotate certificates, or perform remote troubleshooting operations.

To create a job, you make a job document which is a description of the remote operations to be performed, and you specify a list of targets that should perform the operations. The targets can be individual things, thing groups or both.

AWS IoT Jobs sends a message to inform the targets that a job is available. The target starts the execution of the job by downloading the job document, performing the operations it specifies, and reporting its progress to AWS IoT. The Jobs service provides commands to track the progress of a job on a specific target and for all the targets of the job

Describes all of the AWS IoT 1-Click device-related API operations for the service. Also provides sample requests, responses, and errors for the supported web services protocols.

The AWS IoT 1-Click Projects API Reference

AWS IoT Analytics allows you to collect large amounts of device data, process messages, and store them. You can then query the data and run sophisticated analytics on it. AWS IoT Analytics enables advanced data exploration through integration with Jupyter Notebooks and data visualization through integration with Amazon QuickSight.

Traditional analytics and business intelligence tools are designed to process structured data. IoT data often comes from devices that record noisy processes (such as temperature, motion, or sound). As a result the data from these devices can have significant gaps, corrupted messages, and false readings that must be cleaned up before analysis can occur. Also, IoT data is often only meaningful in the context of other data from external sources.

AWS IoT Analytics automates the steps required to analyze data from IoT devices. AWS IoT Analytics filters, transforms, and enriches IoT data before storing it in a time-series data store for analysis. You can set up the service to collect only the data you need from your devices, apply mathematical transforms to process the data, and enrich the data with device-specific metadata such as device type and location before storing it. Then, you can analyze your data by running queries using the built-in SQL query engine, or perform more complex analytics and machine learning inference. AWS IoT Analytics includes pre-built models for common IoT use cases so you can answer questions like which devices are about to fail or which customers are at risk of abandoning their wearable devices.

AWS IoT Events monitors your equipment or device fleets for failures or changes in operation, and triggers actions when such events occur. You can use AWS IoT Events API commands to create, read, update, and delete inputs and detector models, and to list their versions.

AWS IoT Events monitors your equipment or device fleets for failures or changes in operation, and triggers actions when such events occur. AWS IoT Events Data API commands enable you to send inputs to detectors, list detectors, and view or update a detector's status.

AWS IoT Secure Tunneling

AWS IoT Secure Tunnling enables you to create remote connections to devices deployed in the field.

For more information about how AWS IoT Secure Tunneling works, see the User Guide.

AWS IoT Things Graph

AWS IoT Things Graph provides an integrated set of tools that enable developers to connect devices and services that use different standards, such as units of measure and communication protocols. AWS IoT Things Graph makes it possible to build IoT applications with little to no code by connecting devices and services and defining how they interact at an abstract level.

For more information about how AWS IoT Things Graph works, see the User Guide.

The operations for managing an Amazon MSK cluster.

Amazon Kendra is a service for indexing large document sets.

Amazon Kinesis Data Streams Service API Reference

Amazon Kinesis Data Streams is a managed service that scales elastically for real-time processing of streaming big data.

Kinesis Video Streams Signaling Service is a intermediate service that establishes a communication channel for discovering peers, transmitting offers and answers in order to establish peer-to-peer connection in webRTC technology.

Amazon Kinesis Analytics

Overview

This documentation is for version 1 of the Amazon Kinesis Data Analytics API, which only supports SQL applications. Version 2 of the API supports SQL and Java applications. For more information about version 2, see Amazon Kinesis Data Analytics API V2 Documentation.

This is the Amazon Kinesis Analytics v1 API Reference. The Amazon Kinesis Analytics Developer Guide provides additional information.

Amazon Kinesis Data Analytics is a fully managed service that you can use to process and analyze streaming data using SQL or Java. The service enables you to quickly author and run SQL or Java code against streaming sources to perform time series analytics, feed real-time dashboards, and create real-time metrics.

AWS Key Management Service

AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) is an encryption and key management web service. This guide describes the AWS KMS operations that you can call programmatically. For general information about AWS KMS, see the AWS Key Management Service Developer Guide .

AWS provides SDKs that consist of libraries and sample code for various programming languages and platforms (Java, Ruby, .Net, macOS, Android, etc.). The SDKs provide a convenient way to create programmatic access to AWS KMS and other AWS services. For example, the SDKs take care of tasks such as signing requests (see below), managing errors, and retrying requests automatically. For more information about the AWS SDKs, including how to download and install them, see Tools for Amazon Web Services.

We recommend that you use the AWS SDKs to make programmatic API calls to AWS KMS.

Clients must support TLS (Transport Layer Security) 1.0. We recommend TLS 1.2. Clients must also support cipher suites with Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) such as Ephemeral Diffie-Hellman (DHE) or Elliptic Curve Ephemeral Diffie-Hellman (ECDHE). Most modern systems such as Java 7 and later support these modes.

Signing Requests

Requests must be signed by using an access key ID and a secret access key. We strongly recommend that you do not use your AWS account (root) access key ID and secret key for everyday work with AWS KMS. Instead, use the access key ID and secret access key for an IAM user. You can also use the AWS Security Token Service to generate temporary security credentials that you can use to sign requests.

All AWS KMS operations require Signature Version 4.

Logging API Requests

AWS KMS supports AWS CloudTrail, a service that logs AWS API calls and related events for your AWS account and delivers them to an Amazon S3 bucket that you specify. By using the information collected by CloudTrail, you can determine what requests were made to AWS KMS, who made the request, when it was made, and so on. To learn more about CloudTrail, including how to turn it on and find your log files, see the AWS CloudTrail User Guide.

Additional Resources

For more information about credentials and request signing, see the following:

Commonly Used API Operations

Of the API operations discussed in this guide, the following will prove the most useful for most applications. You will likely perform operations other than these, such as creating keys and assigning policies, by using the console.

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