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AWS Certificate Manager

Welcome to the AWS Certificate Manager (ACM) API documentation.

You can use ACM to manage SSL/TLS certificates for your AWS-based websites and applications. For general information about using ACM, see the AWS Certificate Manager User Guide .

Amazon API Gateway

Amazon API Gateway helps developers deliver robust, secure, and scalable mobile and web application back ends. Amazon API Gateway allows developers to securely connect mobile and web applications to APIs that run on AWS Lambda, Amazon EC2, or other publicly addressable web services that are hosted outside of AWS.

Amazon AppStream 2.0

You can use Amazon AppStream 2.0 to stream desktop applications to any device running a web browser, without rewriting them.

Amazon Athena is an interactive query service that lets you use standard SQL to analyze data directly in Amazon S3. You can point Athena at your data in Amazon S3 and run ad-hoc queries and get results in seconds. Athena is serverless, so there is no infrastructure to set up or manage. You pay only for the queries you run. Athena scales automatically—executing queries in parallel—so results are fast, even with large datasets and complex queries. For more information, see What is Amazon Athena in the Amazon Athena User Guide.

For code samples using the AWS SDK for Java, see Examples and Code Samples in the Amazon Athena User Guide.

With Application Auto Scaling, you can automatically scale your AWS resources. The experience similar to that of Auto Scaling. You can use Application Auto Scaling to accomplish the following tasks:

  • Define scaling policies to automatically scale your AWS resources

  • Scale your resources in response to CloudWatch alarms

  • View the history of your scaling events

Application Auto Scaling can scale the following AWS resources:

For a list of supported regions, see AWS Regions and Endpoints: Application Auto Scaling in the AWS General Reference.

AWS Batch enables you to run batch computing workloads on the AWS Cloud. Batch computing is a common way for developers, scientists, and engineers to access large amounts of compute resources, and AWS Batch removes the undifferentiated heavy lifting of configuring and managing the required infrastructure. AWS Batch will be familiar to users of traditional batch computing software. This service can efficiently provision resources in response to jobs submitted in order to eliminate capacity constraints, reduce compute costs, and deliver results quickly.

As a fully managed service, AWS Batch enables developers, scientists, and engineers to run batch computing workloads of any scale. AWS Batch automatically provisions compute resources and optimizes the workload distribution based on the quantity and scale of the workloads. With AWS Batch, there is no need to install or manage batch computing software, which allows you to focus on analyzing results and solving problems. AWS Batch reduces operational complexities, saves time, and reduces costs, which makes it easy for developers, scientists, and engineers to run their batch jobs in the AWS Cloud.

All public APIs for AWS Budgets

Amazon Cloud Directory

Amazon Cloud Directory is a component of the AWS Directory Service that simplifies the development and management of cloud-scale web, mobile, and IoT applications. This guide describes the Cloud Directory operations that you can call programmatically and includes detailed information on data types and errors. For information about AWS Directory Services features, see AWS Directory Service and the AWS Directory Service Administration Guide.

AWS CloudFormation

AWS CloudFormation allows you to create and manage AWS infrastructure deployments predictably and repeatedly. You can use AWS CloudFormation to leverage AWS products, such as Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud, Amazon Elastic Block Store, Amazon Simple Notification Service, Elastic Load Balancing, and Auto Scaling to build highly-reliable, highly scalable, cost-effective applications without creating or configuring the underlying AWS infrastructure.

With AWS CloudFormation, you declare all of your resources and dependencies in a template file. The template defines a collection of resources as a single unit called a stack. AWS CloudFormation creates and deletes all member resources of the stack together and manages all dependencies between the resources for you.

For more information about AWS CloudFormation, see the AWS CloudFormation Product Page.

Amazon CloudFormation makes use of other AWS products. If you need additional technical information about a specific AWS product, you can find the product's technical documentation at docs.aws.amazon.com.

Amazon CloudFront

This is the Amazon CloudFront API Reference. This guide is for developers who need detailed information about the CloudFront API actions, data types, and errors. For detailed information about CloudFront features and their associated API calls, see the Amazon CloudFront Developer Guide.

AWS CloudHSM Service

This is the reference for AWS CloudHSM Classic. For more information, see AWS CloudHSM Classic FAQs and the AWS CloudHSM Classic User Guide.

For more information about AWS CloudHSM, see AWS CloudHSM and the AWS CloudHSM User Guide.

For more information about AWS CloudHSM, see AWS CloudHSM and the AWS CloudHSM User Guide.

Amazon CloudSearch Configuration Service

You use the Amazon CloudSearch configuration service to create, configure, and manage search domains. Configuration service requests are submitted using the AWS Query protocol. AWS Query requests are HTTP or HTTPS requests submitted via HTTP GET or POST with a query parameter named Action.

The endpoint for configuration service requests is region-specific: cloudsearch.region.amazonaws.com. For example, cloudsearch.us-east-1.amazonaws.com. For a current list of supported regions and endpoints, see Regions and Endpoints.

You use the AmazonCloudSearch2013 API to upload documents to a search domain and search those documents.

The endpoints for submitting UploadDocuments, Search, and Suggest requests are domain-specific. To get the endpoints for your domain, use the Amazon CloudSearch configuration service DescribeDomains action. The domain endpoints are also displayed on the domain dashboard in the Amazon CloudSearch console. You submit suggest requests to the search endpoint.

For more information, see the Amazon CloudSearch Developer Guide.

AWS CloudTrail

This is the CloudTrail API Reference. It provides descriptions of actions, data types, common parameters, and common errors for CloudTrail.

CloudTrail is a web service that records AWS API calls for your AWS account and delivers log files to an Amazon S3 bucket. The recorded information includes the identity of the user, the start time of the AWS API call, the source IP address, the request parameters, and the response elements returned by the service.

As an alternative to the API, you can use one of the AWS SDKs, which consist of libraries and sample code for various programming languages and platforms (Java, Ruby, .NET, iOS, Android, etc.). The SDKs provide a convenient way to create programmatic access to AWSCloudTrail. For example, the SDKs take care of cryptographically signing requests, managing errors, and retrying requests automatically. For information about the AWS SDKs, including how to download and install them, see the Tools for Amazon Web Services page.

See the AWS CloudTrail User Guide for information about the data that is included with each AWS API call listed in the log files.

AWS CodeBuild

AWS CodeBuild is a fully managed build service in the cloud. AWS CodeBuild compiles your source code, runs unit tests, and produces artifacts that are ready to deploy. AWS CodeBuild eliminates the need to provision, manage, and scale your own build servers. It provides prepackaged build environments for the most popular programming languages and build tools, such as Apache Maven, Gradle, and more. You can also fully customize build environments in AWS CodeBuild to use your own build tools. AWS CodeBuild scales automatically to meet peak build requests, and you pay only for the build time you consume. For more information about AWS CodeBuild, see the AWS CodeBuild User Guide.

AWS CodeBuild supports these operations:

  • BatchDeleteBuilds: Deletes one or more builds.

  • BatchGetProjects: Gets information about one or more build projects. A build project defines how AWS CodeBuild will run a build. This includes information such as where to get the source code to build, the build environment to use, the build commands to run, and where to store the build output. A build environment represents a combination of operating system, programming language runtime, and tools that AWS CodeBuild will use to run a build. Also, you can add tags to build projects to help manage your resources and costs.

  • CreateProject: Creates a build project.

  • CreateWebhook: For an existing AWS CodeBuild build project that has its source code stored in a GitHub repository, enables AWS CodeBuild to begin automatically rebuilding the source code every time a code change is pushed to the repository.

  • DeleteProject: Deletes a build project.

  • DeleteWebhook: For an existing AWS CodeBuild build project that has its source code stored in a GitHub repository, stops AWS CodeBuild from automatically rebuilding the source code every time a code change is pushed to the repository.

  • ListProjects: Gets a list of build project names, with each build project name representing a single build project.

  • UpdateProject: Changes the settings of an existing build project.

  • BatchGetBuilds: Gets information about one or more builds.

  • ListBuilds: Gets a list of build IDs, with each build ID representing a single build.

  • ListBuildsForProject: Gets a list of build IDs for the specified build project, with each build ID representing a single build.

  • StartBuild: Starts running a build.

  • StopBuild: Attempts to stop running a build.

  • ListCuratedEnvironmentImages: Gets information about Docker images that are managed by AWS CodeBuild.

AWS CodeCommit

This is the AWS CodeCommit API Reference. This reference provides descriptions of the operations and data types for AWS CodeCommit API along with usage examples.

You can use the AWS CodeCommit API to work with the following objects:

Repositories, by calling the following:

  • BatchGetRepositories, which returns information about one or more repositories associated with your AWS account

  • CreateRepository, which creates an AWS CodeCommit repository

  • DeleteRepository, which deletes an AWS CodeCommit repository

  • GetRepository, which returns information about a specified repository

  • ListRepositories, which lists all AWS CodeCommit repositories associated with your AWS account

  • UpdateRepositoryDescription, which sets or updates the description of the repository

  • UpdateRepositoryName, which changes the name of the repository. If you change the name of a repository, no other users of that repository will be able to access it until you send them the new HTTPS or SSH URL to use.

Branches, by calling the following:

  • CreateBranch, which creates a new branch in a specified repository

  • DeleteBranch, which deletes the specified branch in a repository unless it is the default branch

  • GetBranch, which returns information about a specified branch

  • ListBranches, which lists all branches for a specified repository

  • UpdateDefaultBranch, which changes the default branch for a repository

Information about committed code in a repository, by calling the following:

  • GetBlob, which returns the base-64 encoded content of an individual Git blob object within a repository

  • GetCommit, which returns information about a commit, including commit messages and author and committer information

  • GetDifferences, which returns information about the differences in a valid commit specifier (such as a branch, tag, HEAD, commit ID or other fully qualified reference)

Triggers, by calling the following:

  • GetRepositoryTriggers, which returns information about triggers configured for a repository

  • PutRepositoryTriggers, which replaces all triggers for a repository and can be used to create or delete triggers

  • TestRepositoryTriggers, which tests the functionality of a repository trigger by sending data to the trigger target

For information about how to use AWS CodeCommit, see the AWS CodeCommit User Guide.

AWS CodeDeploy

AWS CodeDeploy is a deployment service that automates application deployments to Amazon EC2 instances or on-premises instances running in your own facility.

You can deploy a nearly unlimited variety of application content, such as code, web and configuration files, executables, packages, scripts, multimedia files, and so on. AWS CodeDeploy can deploy application content stored in Amazon S3 buckets, GitHub repositories, or Bitbucket repositories. You do not need to make changes to your existing code before you can use AWS CodeDeploy.

AWS CodeDeploy makes it easier for you to rapidly release new features, helps you avoid downtime during application deployment, and handles the complexity of updating your applications, without many of the risks associated with error-prone manual deployments.

AWS CodeDeploy Components

Use the information in this guide to help you work with the following AWS CodeDeploy components:

  • Application: A name that uniquely identifies the application you want to deploy. AWS CodeDeploy uses this name, which functions as a container, to ensure the correct combination of revision, deployment configuration, and deployment group are referenced during a deployment.

  • Deployment group: A set of individual instances. A deployment group contains individually tagged instances, Amazon EC2 instances in Auto Scaling groups, or both.

  • Deployment configuration: A set of deployment rules and deployment success and failure conditions used by AWS CodeDeploy during a deployment.

  • Deployment: The process, and the components involved in the process, of installing content on one or more instances.

  • Application revisions: An archive file containing source content—source code, web pages, executable files, and deployment scripts—along with an application specification file (AppSpec file). Revisions are stored in Amazon S3 buckets or GitHub repositories. For Amazon S3, a revision is uniquely identified by its Amazon S3 object key and its ETag, version, or both. For GitHub, a revision is uniquely identified by its commit ID.

This guide also contains information to help you get details about the instances in your deployments and to make on-premises instances available for AWS CodeDeploy deployments.

AWS CodeDeploy Information Resources

AWS CodePipeline

Overview

This is the AWS CodePipeline API Reference. This guide provides descriptions of the actions and data types for AWS CodePipeline. Some functionality for your pipeline is only configurable through the API. For additional information, see the AWS CodePipeline User Guide.

You can use the AWS CodePipeline API to work with pipelines, stages, actions, gates, and transitions, as described below.

Pipelines are models of automated release processes. Each pipeline is uniquely named, and consists of actions, gates, and stages.

You can work with pipelines by calling:

  • CreatePipeline, which creates a uniquely-named pipeline.

  • DeletePipeline, which deletes the specified pipeline.

  • GetPipeline, which returns information about the pipeline structure and pipeline metadata, including the pipeline Amazon Resource Name (ARN).

  • GetPipelineExecution, which returns information about a specific execution of a pipeline.

  • GetPipelineState, which returns information about the current state of the stages and actions of a pipeline.

  • ListPipelines, which gets a summary of all of the pipelines associated with your account.

  • ListPipelineExecutions, which gets a summary of the most recent executions for a pipeline.

  • StartPipelineExecution, which runs the the most recent revision of an artifact through the pipeline.

  • UpdatePipeline, which updates a pipeline with edits or changes to the structure of the pipeline.

Pipelines include stages, which are logical groupings of gates and actions. Each stage contains one or more actions that must complete before the next stage begins. A stage will result in success or failure. If a stage fails, then the pipeline stops at that stage and will remain stopped until either a new version of an artifact appears in the source location, or a user takes action to re-run the most recent artifact through the pipeline. You can call GetPipelineState, which displays the status of a pipeline, including the status of stages in the pipeline, or GetPipeline, which returns the entire structure of the pipeline, including the stages of that pipeline. For more information about the structure of stages and actions, also refer to the AWS CodePipeline Pipeline Structure Reference.

Pipeline stages include actions, which are categorized into categories such as source or build actions performed within a stage of a pipeline. For example, you can use a source action to import artifacts into a pipeline from a source such as Amazon S3. Like stages, you do not work with actions directly in most cases, but you do define and interact with actions when working with pipeline operations such as CreatePipeline and GetPipelineState.

Pipelines also include transitions, which allow the transition of artifacts from one stage to the next in a pipeline after the actions in one stage complete.

You can work with transitions by calling:

Using the API to integrate with AWS CodePipeline

For third-party integrators or developers who want to create their own integrations with AWS CodePipeline, the expected sequence varies from the standard API user. In order to integrate with AWS CodePipeline, developers will need to work with the following items:

Jobs, which are instances of an action. For example, a job for a source action might import a revision of an artifact from a source.

You can work with jobs by calling:

Third party jobs, which are instances of an action created by a partner action and integrated into AWS CodePipeline. Partner actions are created by members of the AWS Partner Network.

You can work with third party jobs by calling:

AWS CodeStar

This is the API reference for AWS CodeStar. This reference provides descriptions of the operations and data types for the AWS CodeStar API along with usage examples.

You can use the AWS CodeStar API to work with:

Projects and their resources, by calling the following:

  • DeleteProject, which deletes a project.

  • DescribeProject, which lists the attributes of a project.

  • ListProjects, which lists all projects associated with your AWS account.

  • ListResources, which lists the resources associated with a project.

  • ListTagsForProject, which lists the tags associated with a project.

  • TagProject, which adds tags to a project.

  • UntagProject, which removes tags from a project.

  • UpdateProject, which updates the attributes of a project.

Teams and team members, by calling the following:

  • AssociateTeamMember, which adds an IAM user to the team for a project.

  • DisassociateTeamMember, which removes an IAM user from the team for a project.

  • ListTeamMembers, which lists all the IAM users in the team for a project, including their roles and attributes.

  • UpdateTeamMember, which updates a team member's attributes in a project.

Users, by calling the following:

  • CreateUserProfile, which creates a user profile that contains data associated with the user across all projects.

  • DeleteUserProfile, which deletes all user profile information across all projects.

  • DescribeUserProfile, which describes the profile of a user.

  • ListUserProfiles, which lists all user profiles.

  • UpdateUserProfile, which updates the profile for a user.

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