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AWS Key Management Service

AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) is an encryption and key management web service. This guide describes the AWS KMS operations that you can call programmatically. For general information about AWS KMS, see the AWS Key Management Service Developer Guide.

AWS provides SDKs that consist of libraries and sample code for various programming languages and platforms (Java, Ruby, .Net, iOS, Android, etc.). The SDKs provide a convenient way to create programmatic access to AWS KMS and other AWS services. For example, the SDKs take care of tasks such as signing requests (see below), managing errors, and retrying requests automatically. For more information about the AWS SDKs, including how to download and install them, see Tools for Amazon Web Services.

We recommend that you use the AWS SDKs to make programmatic API calls to AWS KMS.

Clients must support TLS (Transport Layer Security) 1.0. We recommend TLS 1.2. Clients must also support cipher suites with Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) such as Ephemeral Diffie-Hellman (DHE) or Elliptic Curve Ephemeral Diffie-Hellman (ECDHE). Most modern systems such as Java 7 and later support these modes.

Signing Requests

Requests must be signed by using an access key ID and a secret access key. We strongly recommend that you do not use your AWS account (root) access key ID and secret key for everyday work with AWS KMS. Instead, use the access key ID and secret access key for an IAM user, or you can use the AWS Security Token Service to generate temporary security credentials that you can use to sign requests.

All AWS KMS operations require Signature Version 4.

Logging API Requests

AWS KMS supports AWS CloudTrail, a service that logs AWS API calls and related events for your AWS account and delivers them to an Amazon S3 bucket that you specify. By using the information collected by CloudTrail, you can determine what requests were made to AWS KMS, who made the request, when it was made, and so on. To learn more about CloudTrail, including how to turn it on and find your log files, see the AWS CloudTrail User Guide.

Additional Resources

For more information about credentials and request signing, see the following:

Commonly Used APIs

Of the APIs discussed in this guide, the following will prove the most useful for most applications. You will likely perform actions other than these, such as creating keys and assigning policies, by using the console.

AWS Lambda

Overview

This is the AWS Lambda API Reference. The AWS Lambda Developer Guide provides additional information. For the service overview, see What is AWS Lambda, and for information about how the service works, see AWS Lambda: How it Works in the AWS Lambda Developer Guide.

Amazon Lightsail is the easiest way to get started with AWS for developers who just need virtual private servers. Lightsail includes everything you need to launch your project quickly - a virtual machine, SSD-based storage, data transfer, DNS management, and a static IP - for a low, predictable price. You manage those Lightsail servers through the Lightsail console or by using the API or command-line interface (CLI).

For more information about Lightsail concepts and tasks, see the Lightsail Dev Guide.

To use the Lightsail API or the CLI, you will need to use AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) to generate access keys. For details about how to set this up, see the Lightsail Dev Guide.

Definition of the public APIs exposed by Amazon Machine Learning

Provides AWS Marketplace business intelligence data on-demand.

AWS Marketplace Metering Service

This reference provides descriptions of the low-level AWS Marketplace Metering Service API.

AWS Marketplace sellers can use this API to submit usage data for custom usage dimensions.

Submitting Metering Records

  • MeterUsage- Submits the metering record for a Marketplace product. MeterUsage is called from an EC2 instance.

  • BatchMeterUsage- Submits the metering record for a set of customers. BatchMeterUsage is called from a software-as-a-service (SaaS) application.

Accepting New Customers

  • ResolveCustomer- Called by a SaaS application during the registration process. When a buyer visits your website during the registration process, the buyer submits a Registration Token through the browser. The Registration Token is resolved through this API to obtain a CustomerIdentifier and Product Code.

AWS Mobile Service provides mobile app and website developers with capabilities required to configure AWS resources and bootstrap their developer desktop projects with the necessary SDKs, constants, tools and samples to make use of those resources.

Amazon Mobile Analytics is a service for collecting, visualizing, and understanding app usage data at scale.

Amazon Lex Build-Time Actions

Amazon Lex is an AWS service for building conversational voice and text interfaces. Use these actions to create, update, and delete conversational bots for new and existing client applications.

Amazon CloudWatch monitors your Amazon Web Services (AWS) resources and the applications you run on AWS in real time. You can use CloudWatch to collect and track metrics, which are the variables you want to measure for your resources and applications.

CloudWatch alarms send notifications or automatically change the resources you are monitoring based on rules that you define. For example, you can monitor the CPU usage and disk reads and writes of your Amazon EC2 instances. Then, use this data to determine whether you should launch additional instances to handle increased load. You can also use this data to stop under-used instances to save money.

In addition to monitoring the built-in metrics that come with AWS, you can monitor your own custom metrics. With CloudWatch, you gain system-wide visibility into resource utilization, application performance, and operational health.

Amazon Mechanical Turk API Reference

AWS OpsWorks

Welcome to the AWS OpsWorks Stacks API Reference. This guide provides descriptions, syntax, and usage examples for AWS OpsWorks Stacks actions and data types, including common parameters and error codes.

AWS OpsWorks Stacks is an application management service that provides an integrated experience for overseeing the complete application lifecycle. For information about this product, go to the AWS OpsWorks details page.

SDKs and CLI

The most common way to use the AWS OpsWorks Stacks API is by using the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) or by using one of the AWS SDKs to implement applications in your preferred language. For more information, see:

Endpoints

AWS OpsWorks Stacks supports the following endpoints, all HTTPS. You must connect to one of the following endpoints. Stacks can only be accessed or managed within the endpoint in which they are created.

  • opsworks.us-east-1.amazonaws.com

  • opsworks.us-east-2.amazonaws.com

  • opsworks.us-west-1.amazonaws.com

  • opsworks.us-west-2.amazonaws.com

  • opsworks.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com

  • opsworks.eu-west-2.amazonaws.com

  • opsworks.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com

  • opsworks.ap-northeast-1.amazonaws.com

  • opsworks.ap-northeast-2.amazonaws.com

  • opsworks.ap-south-1.amazonaws.com

  • opsworks.ap-southeast-1.amazonaws.com

  • opsworks.ap-southeast-2.amazonaws.com

  • opsworks.sa-east-1.amazonaws.com

Chef Versions

When you call CreateStack, CloneStack, or UpdateStack we recommend you use the ConfigurationManager parameter to specify the Chef version. The recommended and default value for Linux stacks is currently 12. Windows stacks use Chef 12.2. For more information, see Chef Versions.

You can specify Chef 12, 11.10, or 11.4 for your Linux stack. We recommend migrating your existing Linux stacks to Chef 12 as soon as possible.

AWS OpsWorks for Chef Automate

AWS OpsWorks for Chef Automate is a service that runs and manages configuration management servers.

Glossary of terms

  • Server: A configuration management server that can be highly-available. The configuration manager runs on your instances by using various AWS services, such as Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), and potentially Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS). A server is a generic abstraction over the configuration manager that you want to use, much like Amazon RDS. In AWS OpsWorks for Chef Automate, you do not start or stop servers. After you create servers, they continue to run until they are deleted.

  • Engine: The specific configuration manager that you want to use (such as Chef) is the engine.

  • Backup: This is an application-level backup of the data that the configuration manager stores. A backup creates a .tar.gz file that is stored in an Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) bucket in your account. AWS OpsWorks for Chef Automate creates the S3 bucket when you launch the first instance. A backup maintains a snapshot of all of a server's important attributes at the time of the backup.

  • Events: Events are always related to a server. Events are written during server creation, when health checks run, when backups are created, etc. When you delete a server, the server's events are also deleted.

  • AccountAttributes: Every account has attributes that are assigned in the AWS OpsWorks for Chef Automate database. These attributes store information about configuration limits (servers, backups, etc.) and your customer account.

Endpoints

AWS OpsWorks for Chef Automate supports the following endpoints, all HTTPS. You must connect to one of the following endpoints. Chef servers can only be accessed or managed within the endpoint in which they are created.

  • opsworks-cm.us-east-1.amazonaws.com

  • opsworks-cm.us-west-2.amazonaws.com

  • opsworks-cm.eu-west-1.amazonaws.com

Throttling limits

All API operations allow for five requests per second with a burst of 10 requests per second.

AWS Organizations API Reference

AWS Organizations is a web service that enables you to consolidate your multiple AWS accounts into an organization and centrally manage your accounts and their resources.

This guide provides descriptions of the Organizations API. For more information about using this service, see the AWS Organizations User Guide.

API Version

This version of the Organizations API Reference documents the Organizations API version 2016-11-28.

As an alternative to using the API directly, you can use one of the AWS SDKs, which consist of libraries and sample code for various programming languages and platforms (Java, Ruby, .NET, iOS, Android, and more). The SDKs provide a convenient way to create programmatic access to AWS Organizations. For example, the SDKs take care of cryptographically signing requests, managing errors, and retrying requests automatically. For more information about the AWS SDKs, including how to download and install them, see Tools for Amazon Web Services.

We recommend that you use the AWS SDKs to make programmatic API calls to Organizations. However, you also can use the Organizations Query API to make direct calls to the Organizations web service. To learn more about the Organizations Query API, see Making Query Requests in the AWS Organizations User Guide. Organizations supports GET and POST requests for all actions. That is, the API does not require you to use GET for some actions and POST for others. However, GET requests are subject to the limitation size of a URL. Therefore, for operations that require larger sizes, use a POST request.

Signing Requests

When you send HTTP requests to AWS, you must sign the requests so that AWS can identify who sent them. You sign requests with your AWS access key, which consists of an access key ID and a secret access key. We strongly recommend that you do not create an access key for your root account. Anyone who has the access key for your root account has unrestricted access to all the resources in your account. Instead, create an access key for an IAM user account that has administrative privileges. As another option, use AWS Security Token Service to generate temporary security credentials, and use those credentials to sign requests.

To sign requests, we recommend that you use Signature Version 4. If you have an existing application that uses Signature Version 2, you do not have to update it to use Signature Version 4. However, some operations now require Signature Version 4. The documentation for operations that require version 4 indicate this requirement.

When you use the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI) or one of the AWS SDKs to make requests to AWS, these tools automatically sign the requests for you with the access key that you specify when you configure the tools.

In this release, each organization can have only one root. In a future release, a single organization will support multiple roots.

Support and Feedback for AWS Organizations

We welcome your feedback. Send your comments to feedback-awsorganizations@amazon.com or post your feedback and questions in our private AWS Organizations support forum. If you don't have access to the forum, send a request for access to the email address, along with your forum user ID. For more information about the AWS support forums, see Forums Help.

Endpoint to Call When Using the CLI or the AWS API

For the current release of Organizations, you must specify the us-east-1 region for all AWS API and CLI calls. You can do this in the CLI by using these parameters and commands:

  • Use the following parameter with each command to specify both the endpoint and its region:

    --endpoint-url https://organizations.us-east-1.amazonaws.com

  • Use the default endpoint, but configure your default region with this command:

    aws configure set default.region us-east-1

  • Use the following parameter with each command to specify the endpoint:

    --region us-east-1

For the various SDKs used to call the APIs, see the documentation for the SDK of interest to learn how to direct the requests to a specific endpoint. For more information, see Regions and Endpoints in the AWS General Reference.

How examples are presented

The JSON returned by the AWS Organizations service as response to your requests is returned as a single long string without line breaks or formatting whitespace. Both line breaks and whitespace are included in the examples in this guide to improve readability. When example input parameters also would result in long strings that would extend beyond the screen, we insert line breaks to enhance readability. You should always submit the input as a single JSON text string.

Recording API Requests

AWS Organizations supports AWS CloudTrail, a service that records AWS API calls for your AWS account and delivers log files to an Amazon S3 bucket. By using information collected by AWS CloudTrail, you can determine which requests were successfully made to Organizations, who made the request, when it was made, and so on. For more about AWS Organizations and its support for AWS CloudTrail, see Logging AWS Organizations Events with AWS CloudTrail in the AWS Organizations User Guide. To learn more about CloudTrail, including how to turn it on and find your log files, see the AWS CloudTrail User Guide.

Amazon Polly is a web service that makes it easy to synthesize speech from text.

The Amazon Polly service provides API operations for synthesizing high-quality speech from plain text and Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML), along with managing pronunciations lexicons that enable you to get the best results for your application domain.

Amazon Relational Database Service

Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) is a web service that makes it easier to set up, operate, and scale a relational database in the cloud. It provides cost-efficient, resizable capacity for an industry-standard relational database and manages common database administration tasks, freeing up developers to focus on what makes their applications and businesses unique.

Amazon RDS gives you access to the capabilities of a MySQL, MariaDB, PostgreSQL, Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle, or Amazon Aurora database server. These capabilities mean that the code, applications, and tools you already use today with your existing databases work with Amazon RDS without modification. Amazon RDS automatically backs up your database and maintains the database software that powers your DB instance. Amazon RDS is flexible: you can scale your database instance's compute resources and storage capacity to meet your application's demand. As with all Amazon Web Services, there are no up-front investments, and you pay only for the resources you use.

This interface reference for Amazon RDS contains documentation for a programming or command line interface you can use to manage Amazon RDS. Note that Amazon RDS is asynchronous, which means that some interfaces might require techniques such as polling or callback functions to determine when a command has been applied. In this reference, the parameter descriptions indicate whether a command is applied immediately, on the next instance reboot, or during the maintenance window. The reference structure is as follows, and we list following some related topics from the user guide.

Amazon RDS API Reference

Amazon RDS User Guide

Amazon Redshift

Overview

This is an interface reference for Amazon Redshift. It contains documentation for one of the programming or command line interfaces you can use to manage Amazon Redshift clusters. Note that Amazon Redshift is asynchronous, which means that some interfaces may require techniques, such as polling or asynchronous callback handlers, to determine when a command has been applied. In this reference, the parameter descriptions indicate whether a change is applied immediately, on the next instance reboot, or during the next maintenance window. For a summary of the Amazon Redshift cluster management interfaces, go to Using the Amazon Redshift Management Interfaces.

Amazon Redshift manages all the work of setting up, operating, and scaling a data warehouse: provisioning capacity, monitoring and backing up the cluster, and applying patches and upgrades to the Amazon Redshift engine. You can focus on using your data to acquire new insights for your business and customers.

If you are a first-time user of Amazon Redshift, we recommend that you begin by reading the Amazon Redshift Getting Started Guide.

If you are a database developer, the Amazon Redshift Database Developer Guide explains how to design, build, query, and maintain the databases that make up your data warehouse.

This is the Amazon Rekognition API reference.

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